Slavery of females alive and well in USA

BettyJean Kling

What would be done if black men were being kept as slaves in S.D. in 2011?

Unfortunately the race baiting and false accusations of racism have taken the focus off the real slavery problems still existing in this world and growing in our very country. While black racists have shrouded their exploit of race baiting and successfully pulled the race card for the last three years, growing misogyny towards women has continued to descend in importance to the imagined racism. Indeed, all minorities have become so adept at constantly complaining about their real or imagined current or former plights, leaving little tolerance for sexism as if very few appear to appreciate it even exists. Regardless of proof to the contrary, women are ignored, not taken seriously or they are blamed for any of the problems they encounter. They are berated, humiliated, degraded and never given the benefit of the doubt . Minorities on the other hand are to be treated with kid gloves!

Don’t get me wrong, I for one am not asking for welfare, kid gloves or any special services- keep it, but women are entitled to equal protection under the law and we are not getting the respect, or the protection. We are not entitled to call IT what it is!

SEXISM — MISOGYNY– SLAVERY

What would be done if black men were being kept as slaves in S.D. in 2011?

Human bondage hits U.S. heartland
Illicit trade for labor, sex generates billions in profits

By Chuck Neubauer
The Washington Times 8:18 p.m., Sunday, March 27, 2

People were shocked when federal prosecutors charged the owners of a motel in Oacoma, S.D., a town of fewer than 500, with keeping Philippine women in virtual slavery, forcing them to work 20-hour days under the threat of violence and taking back their paychecks after they had been endorsed to deposit in their own accounts.

Prosecutors said the enslaved women performed cleaning and front-desk duties at the motel and were expected to work second jobs at fast-food restaurants. Every aspect of their lives, according to records in the 2007 case, was controlled, including what they ate, where they lived, what they wore and to whom they spoke.

Human traffickers had crept unnoticed into the small Lyman County community, located on the west bank of the Missouri River 80 miles southeast of Pierre, the state’s capital. But the townsfolk soon learned that Interstate 90, which roars right by Oacoma, is part of the “Midwest Pipeline,” the superhighway used to deliver trafficking victims to cities across the country.

READ MORE: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/mar/27/human-bondage-hits-us-heartland/