Feminist Click Moment: You’re Against Battered Women’s Shelters?!

Georgia Platts –BroadBlogs

“We’ve got to stop those feminists from setting up a battered women’s shelter!”

So proclaimed my piano teacher in numerous post-lesson conversations with my mom. When she wasn’t grumbling about shelters she was remarking on how lovely Phyllis Schlafly’s bouffant looked alongside those long-haired feminists.

I didn’t get it. “Why doesn’t she want shelters?” I asked my mom.

Mom didn’t get it either. “I suppose she’s concerned that they don’t have the right training to run one,” she speculated.

Actually, my piano teacher probably didn’t know why she was against shelters, either. Aligned with “the F-word,” they must be bad.

None of us knew. But as it turns out, the whole family-values agenda that my teacher so revered was intent on maintaining male power and female submission.

My piano teacher was a member of my church. Back then, in the ’70s, Mormonism was in major backlash against the feminist movement. And that gave rise to a series of little “clicks,” leading up to a major feminist “click” moment for me.

In my church’s backlash, women were suddenly forbidden from leading prayer during worship services. Worse yet (to me), girls had to wear dresses to “Activity Night,” and lessons on the importance of marriage overtook other activities.

Priesthood, forbidden to women, is bestowed upon all males at age 12. If gender inequality were not bad enough, watching my late-maturing boy-peers take on that mantel seemed ludicrous. I was especially not happy when my little brother received the priesthood. Worse, my divorced mother then declared him “head of home,” presiding over my grandmother, mother and me. I wasn’t having any of it, so that befuddled notion never became reality.

The final click? The proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back? Although Mormonism gave up polygamy (“Mormon Fundamentalists” keep the tradition), from the time I was little I was taught that polygamy was the way of Heaven because, ironically, women were sweeter in spirit so there would be more of us up there. I suddenly realized that if I were the best person I could be, my eternal reward would be second-class status as a woman and marriage to a polygamous man. Heaven? Sounded more like Hell to me.

Interestingly, I attended my old congregation a while back while visiting my mother, and heard an announcement that her congregation was raising money for a battered women’s shelter! I also heard concern that “unequal spousal relationships” were a primary cause of family disintegration. Maybe that’s hopeful. I know many young feminist women who today live in peace with Mormonism. Some have even started a blog: Feminist Mormon Housewives.

Oddly, in some ways my whole trauma has an upside. I don’t know if I would have found my life calling–teaching women’s studies, and writing for the Ms. Blog and creating my own BroadBlogs–if it weren’t for my church’s formidable effort to turn me against feminism. So, in a strange way, I’m tempted to say “thank you.” Too bad the cost is so high.

Glenn Beck Doublespeak: Reclaiming the Civil Rights Movement

Doublespeak: Any language that deliberately disguises, distorts, or reverses the meaning of words.

Glenn Beck wants to “reclaim” the Civil Rights Movement: “We will take that movement because we were the people that did it in the first place!”

Miami Herald columnist, Leonard Pitts asks: whose “we”? Beck’s “we” sounds like people like Beck: affluent, middle-aged conservatives.

Funny, I thought that particular “we” were the backers of the “Southern strategy” that used racism to attract white votes. In the South this “we” largely turned Republican when Democratic President, Lyndon Johnson, signed the Civil Rights Act.

This is right out of Karl Rove’s playbook: Redefine an idea as it’s opposite. Rove turned “W” from National Guard deserter to Iraq/Afghan War Hero as easily as he swift boated war hero, John Kerry, into an unpatriotic fibber.

Orwellian talk is alive and well on the political right. It pops up when “Conservative Feminists”  resist adopting “a male model of careerism and public achievement as female goals, thereby denying women’s need for intimacy, family, and children.” If they had their way, we’d soon backtrack to a world before feminism.

Future Texas textbooks will question the Founding Fathers’ commitment to separation of church and state. They will diminish Thomas Jefferson and expand anti-feminist, Phyllis Schlafly.  Meanwhile, the slave trade will be renamed the “Atlantic triangular trade.” All thanks to a conservative school board.

Taking “we” back from Beck, Pitts names the Civil Rights Movements’ rightful owners: Rosa Parks refusing to sit at the back of the bus, Freedom Riders fighting – and sometimes losing their lives – for the right to vote, Lyndon Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act, and Martin Luther King leading the movement.  

Meanwhile the political right will keep trying to take over our thoughts one word at a time.

Georgia Platts

ERA IS within our reach!

You bet your Ass it is within our reach!

 

Who knew? Phyllis knew and she was out there still fightin it. Phyllis Stewart Schlafly (born August 15, 1924, in St. Louis, Missouri) is an American conservative political activist known for her opposition to feminism.

 

Read all about it!

 

New Drive Afoot to Pass Equal Rights Amendment

By Juliet Eilperin

Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, March 28, 2007; Page A01

Federal and state lawmakers have launched a new drive to pass the Equal Rights Amendment, reviving a feminist goal that faltered a quarter-century ago when the measure did not gain the approval of three-quarters of the state legislatures.

 Read the rest here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/27/AR2007032702357.html

 

 

And have we heard about any of this?- NO! Ok ladies they hid it from us since 2007- but Debbie – a friend of mine  found it. And I am here to tell you that we can do something about it. Success is within our reach. So what are we waiting for ladies? Let’s roll! NOW! 

 

I will be launching an all out effort to get us to get the signatures needed in those states – let’s get er done ladies! This is our year! I will need help – Let’s put a group together and get to work.

 

“Equality of rights under the law shall not be
denied or abridged by the United States or
by any state on account of sex.”

 

The U.S. Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment in 1972, but it set a seven year time limit for ratification. During this time 38 states needed to ratify the amendment. Congress later added a three year extension, but by June 30, 1982 the amendment was three states short of full ratification. Then in 1992, Congress added the Madison Amendment to the Constitution. The Madison Amendment was passed by Congress in 1789. The ratification of this 27th amendment, 203 years after it was passed by Congress, set a precedent which, when applied to the Equal Rights Amendment, means that the ERA is still legally viable and before the states. According to this legal opinion, Congressional Research Service at the Library of Congress full ratification can be achieved once three more states ratify the ERA.

 

Unratified States

.Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia

 

ERA resolutions introduced in 2007:

Arizona-SCR1019, HCR2046

Arkansas–HJR 1002

Illinois–HJRCA0002

Florida–S0272, H8003

Louisiana–HCR 4

Missouri–SCR7

 

There are also active ERA campaigns in

Georgia, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and South Carolina.