Louisiana Purchase: November 2009

First purchased in 1803 for 15 million bucks – we negotiated for land that encompased  14 states!

The U.S. paid 60 million francs ($11,250,000) plus cancellation of debts worth 18 million francs ($3,750,000), a total cost of 15 million dollars for the Louisiana territory.[1][2][3]

The Louisiana Purchase encompassed all or part of 14 current U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The land purchased contained all of present-day Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, parts of Minnesota that were west of the Mississippi River, most of North Dakota, nearly all of South Dakota, northeastern New Mexico, the portions of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide, and Louisiana west of the Mississippi River, including the city of New Orleans. (The Oklahoma Panhandle, and southwestern portions of Kansas and Louisiana were still claimed by Spain at the time of the Purchase.) In addition, the Purchase contained small portions of land that would eventually become part of the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The land included in the purchase, doubled the size of the United States, which comprises around 23% of the territory of the United States today.[2] The population was estimated to be 97,000 as of the 1810 census.[4]

The purchase was a vital moment in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson. At the time, it faced domestic opposition as being possibly unconstitutional. Although he felt that the US Constitution did not contain any provisions for acquiring territory, Jefferson decided to purchase Louisiana because he felt uneasy about France and Spain having the power to block American trade access to the port of New Orleans.

In the November 2009 Louisianna Purchase:

Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu is poised to accept $100 million bribe (see below article) in the Senate Healthcare Bill from Majority Leader Harry Reid and vote YES today.
 
CONTACT Sen. Landrieu and her team to voice your objections and urge her to VOTE NO!

Senator Mary Landrieu, Democrat of Louisiana.
 
Phone: 202-224-5824  Fax: 202-224-9735
Snail mail: 328 Hart Bldg., U. S. Senate, Wash., DC 20510
Chief of Staff: Jane Campbell (jane_campbell@landrieu.senate.gov)

Local offices:
 
Baton Rouge: 225-389-0395   fax: 225-389-0660
New Orleans: 504-589-2427   fax- 504-589-4023
Shreveport: 318-676-3085   fax: 318-676-3100
Lake Charles: 337-436-6650   fax: 337-439-3762
Landrieu Communications Team Contact Information:
 
Aaron Saunders, Communications Director
Direct: 202-224-0098   Cell: 202-215-9669
Email: aaronsaunders@landrieu.senate.gov <http://ate.gov

Rob Sawicki, Press Secretary
Direct: 202-224-0098   Cell: 202-262-7006
Email: robertsawicki@landrieu.senate.gov <http://ate.gov

Dan Toffey, New Media Coordinator
Direct: 202-224-4337   Cell: 202-286-0233
Email: dantoffey@landrieu.senate.gov

Ellie Atkins, Press Assistant
Direct: 202-224-0088   Cell: 202-365-2323
Email: ellieatkins@landrieu.senate.gov <http://e.gov

Jetaine Hart, Communications Assistant
Direct: 202-224-1949   Cell: 202-368-1932
Email: jetainehart@landrieu.senate.gov <http://e.gov>  

Sen. Harry Reid Offers Sen. Mary Landrieu $100 Million For Her Vote

Needing every Democrat vote later today, Sen. Harry Reid dealt from the bottom of the political deck. After all, when you have a close vote on a controversial bill, playing with taxpayer dollars is no issue.

On page 432 of the Reid bill, there is a section increasing federal Medicaid subsidies for “certain states recovering from a major disaster.” SEC. 2006. defines which “states” would qualify, stating that it would be states that “during the preceding 7 fiscal years” have been declared a “major disaster area.”  The section applies to exactly one state, Louisiana.

How much does it cost?  According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office: $100 million.

Here’s the language: 

SEC. 2006. SPECIAL ADJUSTMENT TO FMAP DETERMINATION FOR CERTAIN STATES RECOVERING FROM A MAJOR DISASTER.

Section 1905 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396d), as amended by sections 2001(a)(3) and
2001(b)(2), is amended- (1) in subsection (b), in the first sentence, by striking ”subsection (y)” and inserting ”subsections (y) and (aa)”; and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

”(aa)(1) Notwithstanding subsection (b), beginning January 1, 2011, the Federal medical assistance percentage for a fiscal year for a disaster-recovery FMAP adjustment State shall be equal to the following:

‘(A) In the case of the first fiscal year (or part of a fiscal year) for which this subsection applies to the State, the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the fiscal year without regard to this subsection and subsection (y), increased by 50 percent of the number of percentage points by which the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the fiscal year without regard to this subsection and subsection (y), is less than the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the preceding fiscal year after the application of only subsection (a) of section 5001 of Public Law 111-5 (if applicable to the preceding fiscal year) and without regard to this subsection, subsection (y), and subsections (b) and (c) of section 5001 of Public Law 111-5.

”(B) In the case of the second or any succeeding fiscal year for which this subsection applies to the State, the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the preceding fiscal year under this subsection for the State, increased by 25 percent of the number of percentage points by which the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the fiscal year without regard to this subsection and subsection (y), is less than the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the preceding fiscal year under this subsection.

”(2) In this subsection, the term ‘disaster-recovery FMAP adjustment State’ means a State that is one of  the 50 States or the District of Columbia, for which, at any time during the preceding 7 fiscal years, the President has declared a major disaster under section 401 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and determined as a result of such disaster that every county or parish in the State warrant individual and public assistance or public assistance from the Federal Government under such Act and for which- ”(A) in the case of the first fiscal year (or part of a fiscal year) for which this subsection applies to the State, the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the fiscal year without regard to this subsection and subsection (y), is less than the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the preceding fiscal year after the application of only subsection (a) of section 5001 of Public Law 111-5 (if applicable to the preceding fiscal year) and without regard to this subsection, subsection (y), and subsections (b) and (c) of section 5001 of Public Law 111-5, by at least 3 percentage points; and ”(B) in the case of the second or any succeeding fiscal year for which this subsection applies to the State, the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the fiscal year without regard to this subsection and subsection (y), is less than the Federal medical assistance percentage determined for the State for the preceding fiscal year under this subsection by at least 3 percentage points.

”(3) The Federal medical assistance percentage determined for a disaster-recovery FMAP adjustment State under paragraph (1) shall apply for purposes of this title (other than with respect to disproportionate share hospital payments described in section 1923 and payments under this title that are based on the enhanced FMAP described in 2105(b)) and shall not apply with respect to payments under title IV (other than under part E of title IV) or payments under title XXI.”

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2 Responses

  1. money will make you turn your back on your best friend

  2. U.S. Constitution – Article 1 Section 9

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