Sue Else: Even one death resulting from an ineffective NNEDV program is one too many

BettyJean Kling- TMU WOMEN Coalition

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) has concluded a recent survey revealing the strain across the nation on agencies providing services to the victims of domestic violence. Reports show that more than 80 percent of domestic violence programs report an increased demand for their services, while nearly the same number report decreases in funding.

Sue Else, president of NNEDV, said that programs around the country are struggling to provide life-saving services to victims.

“The economy is exacerbating domestic violence, and victim advocates across the country are struggling to do more with less,” Else said.

Sue Else said a mouthful, about “programs around the country struggling to provide life-saving services to victims.” Let’s take Wisconsin for example. According to a report, on Sept. 15, 2010, domestic violence victim advocates answered more than 20,000 emergency hotline calls but more than 9,000 requests went unmet, largely due to lack of funding, said Tony Gibart of the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WCAD).

A recent statewide survey indicated that 88 percent of Wisconsin’s domestic violence programs have experienced funding cuts in the last three years. … Meanwhile, more than 40 percent of Wisconsin programs have had to reduce staff to deal with budget crises.

The year 2009 set decade-high records for domestic violence homicides in Wisconsin, with 67 people losing their lives in 52 incidents. This rise in fatal domestic violence corresponds with recent increased demands on local victim service providers, the study notes.

People Against Domestic and Sexual Abuse (PADA) finds itself in a critical position across the United States.

“Over the last couple of years, we have lost significant funding from the county government and a private foundation,” said Amy Venables O’Neil, executive director of PADA, based in Jefferson County. “We had to make difficult decisions just to maintain basic services. This has all happened while demand increased.”

Clearly, Sue Else, president of NNEDV, has been aware of the severity of the problem for years, she is aware of the 80% rise in demand and corresponding funding cuts yet no cuts in the NNEDV Staffing and administrative costs. Give me a break Sue- have you met any of the goals? Violence is up, laws have not changed nearly enough and exactly how many lives has NNEDV saved because of effectively holding perpetrators accountable?

Staff

Sue Else President
Johnny Capers Chief Financial Officer
Alisha Donovan Transitional Housing Specialist
Nina Gilbert WomensLaw.org Outreach Coordinator
Cheryl Howard Coalition Program Director
Kelly Howard Development Specialist
Kaofeng Lee Safety Net Project & Communications Specialist
Monica McLaughlin Senior Public Policy Specialist
Paulette Sullivan Moore Vice President of Public Policy
Krista Niemczyk Public Policy Coordinator
Erica Olsen Technology Safety Specialist
Kim Pentico Economic Justice Specialist
Rene Renick Vice President of Economic Enterprises
Stacey Sarver Sr. Attorney & WomensLaw.org Legal Director
Ashley Slye Program Coordinator
Cindy Southworth VP. of Development & Innovation
Sarah Tucker Technology Safety Specialist
Mao Yang Resource & TA Specialist
     
 Program Expenses 2007

 

SafetyNet Project: $828,947

Economic Justice Project: $748,764

Transitional Housing Technical Assistance: $663,876

State Coalition Technical Assistance: $468,064

Amy’s Courage Fund: $447,808

Public Policy: $144,522

Other Programs: $78,633

Total: $3,380,614

Mary Kay Foundation and Phillip Morris the biggest contributors to The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) should be notified and encouraged to contribute directly toward saving lives rather than toward the exorbitant salary compensation package for Sue Else amounting to nearly a half million dollars and more than many of the projects themselves i.e. Amy’s Courage fund shown above.

$449,537.00 (including salary and benefits, 2008 Tax Doc on page 24), http://www.free-us-now.com/assets/images/2008-521973408-056e69d1-9.pdf

$275,698 (including salary and benefits) 2009 tax doc, http://www.free-us-now.com/assets/images/2007-521973408-0435a000-9.pdf

According to the Mary Kay Foundation money is given to NNEDV to fund women who need immediate help: If you or anyone you know needs immediate help, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 800-799-SAFE (7233). http://www.marykayfoundation.org/Pages/WomenAndViolence.aspx

Is there any accountability at this national network? Have there been any oversight or performance evaluations? Let’s find out and while we are at it lets get an accounting for where the 25 million went? Did it go to shelters in all 50 states as claimed? The foundation claims: The Mary Kay Foundation has awarded nearly $25 million in grant money to shelters for women and children in all 50 states since 2000.

It is time for us to start asking questions and insisting on answers! The time is now! The proof is in the pudding- after 15 years http://www.nnedv.org/about/history.html what are all these folks getting paid to do and what is being accomplished besides the staff all having a high paying job and a fancy title. Are the victims getting the voice they were promised or the benefits of the listed signature programs?

 NNEDVsignature programs promise but in 15 years have not delivered:

  • Empowering domestic violence survivors to lead independent lives free from abuse;
  • Supporting the 56 state-wide and territorial coalitions against domestic and sexual violence;
  • Advancing economic empowerment and financial literacy for domestic violence survivors and their allies;
  • Improving high-profile media coverage of domestic violence cases;
  • Educating survivors and their allies about safe technological practices and how batterers misuse technology to further abuse;
  • Building the capacity of local and state-wide coalitions against domestic and sexual violence;
  • Providing state-specific legal information for domestic violence survivors; and
  • Promoting federal legislation that effectively holds perpetrators accountable and strengthens services for survivors and their children.

Based on what I’ve experienced firsthand, what women callers tell me on the radio and based on stories from our coalitions partners reported from their readers, bloggers and friends, there are a lot more abusive men out there than we ever realized. It’s way past time we do something about it. And it is way past time we stop settling for window dressing organizations like bogus charities, that collect money just so they can exist but actually use very little of the income for their intended purpose – ‘Network to End Domestic Violence.’ Hell this network isn’t even making a damned dent in it! Like many other Government programs in DC- it’s another failure- victims should do an occupy the NNEDV or at the very least shut ‘em’ down and send the money to the volunteers to use for the victims. We are the ones working for the victims and we are doing it for free!

I am getting fed up with the salaries of these folks remaining high while there are shrinking funds to actually help victims. Much like charities – the lion’s share of the funds go to running the enterprise rather than to those in need! Enough is enough, I say we expose this exploitation of limited funds at the expense of victims!

*WEBMASTER NEEDED:

The TMU WOMEN’s Coalition founded the National Domestic Violence Oversight Committee NDVOC.com. We are a non-partisan volunteer group determined to reform domestic violence and stalking victim resources and public policy so that no victim is left behind.

The purpose of the NDVOC web site is to serve as a forum for survivors to share their experiences and rate victim service providers in the United States. The goal of this site is to hold victim service providers, courts and public safety agencies accountable and to ensure the needs of victims are met.

According to Alexis Moore of Survivors in Action, This is desperately needed. “I still remember like yesterday being turned away and ignored by the DV shelter, National Stalking Resource Center and other national, state and local crime victim agencies wondering where do I go to file complaints for being re-victimized?” Today after talking to thousands of victims across the country with the same complaint—NDVOC is vital in the efforts to reforming victim resources and ensuring that no victim is left behind”.

Maria DiBari of Tri-County Crisis Center agrees there is no oversight and no one is watching those who should be watching where the DV funds are going.

Together with TMU and others we have been three years forming this committee and now we need volunteers across the country to make it happen.

5 Responses

  1. From Moore’s Minutes:

    Resources needed to assist victims of stalking 1 million women and 371,000 men are stalked each year in the US

    By Alexis • January 20, 2010 • Crime Victim Advocacy, Cyberstalking • Leave a comment :

    http://alexismoore.com/resources-needed-to-assist-victims-of/

    Stalking and cyberstalking incidents are on the rise. Survivors In Action has experienced an increasing number of victims reaching out for help. Stalking victims complain still that their cases are not being taken seriously by law enforcement, prosecutors and that they are living and working in fear. This is unacceptable. The startling statistics below are indicative of why Survivors In Action and those who love, serve and support victims of crime must continue to be vigilant in promoting awareness of stalking and help to ensure “No victim is left behind”.

    Pat Walker Health Center – University of Arkansas – 525 North Garland – Fayetteville, AR 72701
    (479) 575-7252 or (479) 575-7722

  2. This is truly only the tip of the iceberg. Victims are being left behind by these agencies and others who continue to be funded with no accountability measures in place to protect the victims they are supposed to serve. There are 3 national “DV” agencies that are funded that do not provide direct support to victims NCADV- National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, NNEDV –National Network to End Domestic Violence, NCSDV National Center on Sexual and Domestic Violence and the National Stalking Resource Center NSRC. Survivors In Action and Tri-County Crisis Center non-profits welcome inquiries from officials, donors and the media to provide evidence in support of DV Reform efforts as well as the solutions to remedy this broken victim resource system.

    We have the evidence to support our statement that victims are being left behind coast to coast by these agencies and state domestic violence coalitions and partnerships. Funding is not the issue management of the funding is. Sue Elyse salary is one example of how mismanaged the funds truly are. The organizations are top-heavy and fail to address the needs of domestic violence and stalking victims while volunteers and underfunded non-profits are forced to take up the slack.

    My hope is that potential donors will think twice before donating to these agencies and take action to ensure the funds they generously donate are being allocated to victim services and not to executives salaries.

    The clients of these agencies are domestic violence and stalking victims who are often facing life or death circumstances. It is unconscionable that these agencies do not have the same oversight and accountability measures in place that other businesses do. The time for DV Reform is now –victims lives depend upon it.

    Alexis A. Moore, founder
    Survivors In Action
    SurvivorsInAction.org
    AlexisMoore.com

    • Well said Alexis- we need a website and volunteers to build it. We need a nationwide alert nd others to step up and report these injustices.
      It is the squeeky door that gets the oil but very few will step forward because they are accustomed to being turned away.
      We will hae to prove- we will not turn our backs and we men it when we say ” No victim should be left behind”

      We will put the site up and they will come!

  3. [...] has to be a meeting of the minds — the NNEDV and NCADV can’t continue to direct public policy without any accountability measures in place. [...]

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